babywearing

Posted: August 27, 2011 in Misang's Motherhood Journey
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My package from Indigo Baby arrived this afternoon. I ordered one of their Baby Pouches. I’m thinking of practicing Iya, or familiarize her inside a sling as I am planning on using this in our future travel. This will be a great tool for me coz I’ll be traveling alone with an 8-month old baby and several bags in hand.

my baby pouch in Baby’s Breath design

 This is our nth time to try babywearing. We even attended a babywearing event for me to learn to use the sling. By the way, there are several types of baby carrier and these are the ones that I’ve already tried

Ring Sling (Next9)

In its simplest and most elegant form, a ring sling is a shawl with a pair of rings attached to one end. The rings replace the knot or tuck-and-twist method of fastening used with traditional shawl carriers such as Mexican rebozos or Indonesian selendangs. Some ring slings have padding where the sling rests on the caregiver’s shoulder or along the edges of the sling, and some depart further from traditional shawl carriers by having the fabric at the end of the sling folded and stitched into a rope-like tail. Ring Slings are an ideal newborn carrier and are also fantastic for the up-and-down toddler phase.

SaYa Baby Carrier (Indigo Baby)

It’s like two slings combined. The Saya baby carrier is a wonderful entry point of babywearing. You can use it in the second your baby is born until your child no longer shows interest in being carried.

Baby Pouch (Indigo Baby)

Simply a tube of fabric with a curved seam, a pouch sling is a sleek carrier option. Pouches are sized to the adult wearer, and what they lack in adjustability they make up for in convenience. Few carriers take up less space in a diaper bag or are as quick to put on and take off as a pouch.  While usable with newborns, many moms find these more fitting once their postpartum weight stabilizes and baby becomes stronger, generally around 4mo.

I tried the first two types and we are not successful. The moment she’s inside the sling and the SaYa, she’s like a newly-formed butterfly trying to wriggle her way out into her cocoon. Good thing I never actually bought any of it. I guess we just need practice, lots of it. When I placed Iya in the pouch this afternoon, I got the same reaction from her so I removed her immediately. I tried again after a few hours and there was improvement. We’ll just practice everyday so that when the time comes, she’s already comfy inside her pouch and I can carry her easily.

Good luck to us. Will just update you soon about or babywearing bonding.

Oh, and before I go, here’s a little background on Babywearing from Babywearing International

“Babywearing” simply means holding or carrying a baby or young child using a cloth baby carrier. Holding babies is natural and universal; baby carriers make it easier and more comfortable, allowing parents and caregivers to hold or carry their children while attending to the daily tasks of living. Babywearing helps a new dad put a fussy newborn to sleep. It allows a new mom use both hands to make a sandwich. It lets an experienced parent or caregiver carry a baby on her back and wash the dishes, do the laundry, take a hike, or weed the garden, all while keeping the baby safe and content.

Babywearing is also a skill. There are many baby carriers on the market. However, a commercial baby carrier is not necessary for babywearing. Many people use simple pieces of cloth to safely and comfortably carry their babies. Additionally, there is a learning curve with any baby product, including commercial baby carriers. Parents and caregivers often benefit from thinking of babywearing as a skill they can learn, rather than as the result of a product they can buy. Many babywearing techniques can be learned in just a few minutes. Some techniques, such as carrying a baby on your back, take more time and practice to master, but the extra effort is rewarded with liberation and increased comfort.

Benefits of Babywearing

  • Happy Babies. It’s true … carried babies cry less! In a study published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers found that babywearing for three hours a day reduced infant crying by 43 percent overall and 54 percent during evening hours.
  • Healthy Babies. Premature babies and babies with special needs often enter the world with fragile nervous systems. When a baby rides in a sling attached to his mother, he is in tune with the rhythm of her breathing, the sound of her heartbeat, and the movements his mother makes—walking, bending, and reaching. This stimulation helps him to regulate his own physical responses. Research has even shown that premature babies who are touched and held gain weight faster and are healthier than babies who are not.
  • Confident Parents. A large part of feeling confident as a parent is the ability to read our babies’ cues successfully. Holding our babies close in a sling allows us to become finely attuned to their movements, gestures, and facial expressions. Every time a baby is able to let us know that she is hungry, bored, or wet without having to cry, her trust in us is increased, her learning is enhanced, and our own confidence is reinforced. This cycle of positive interaction deepens the mutual attachment between parent and child, and is especially beneficial for mothers who are at risk for or suffering from postpartum depression.
  • Loving Caregivers. Baby carriers are a great bonding tool for fathers, grandparents, adoptive parents, babysitters, and other caregivers. Imagine a new father going for a walk with his baby in a sling. The baby is becoming used to his voice, heartbeat, movements, and facial expressions, and the two are forging a strong attachment of their own. Baby carriers are beneficial for every adult in a baby’s life. Cuddling up close in the sling is a wonderful way to get to know the baby in your life, and for the baby to get to know you!
  • Comfort and Convenience. With the help of a good carrier, you can take care of older children or do chores without frequent interruptions from an anxious or distressed infant—which helps to reduce sibling rivalry. Baby carriers are also wonderful to use with older babies and toddlers; you can save those arms and go where strollers can’t. Climbing stairs, hiking, and navigating crowded airports all can be done with ease when you use a well-designed baby carrier!

Read more about Babywearing at Ask Dr. Sears.

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